Englebert Hoff

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Englebert Hoff (Engelbert/Eglebert Hoof/Huff) var en (angivelig) norskfødt mann som døde i Fishkill, New York, USA i enten 1764<ref>The American Museum, Or Universal Magazine, Vol. VIII, juli–desember 1790, s. 45, skriver 8. mars 1764.</ref> eller 1765,<ref>21. mars 1765, jf. Vital Records from the New Hampshire Gazette, 1756–1800.</ref> angivelig i sitt 128. år. Hoff skal ha vært i hollandsk og senere engelsk krigstjeneste og skal visstnok ha deltatt i kaperfart som 70-åring. Han var gift og hadde 12 barn<ref>The American Museum, Or Universal Magazine, Vol. VIII, juli–desember 1790, Philadelphia: Carey, Stewart & Co., 1790, s. 45.</ref>

Selv om alderen vanskelig kan dokumenteres, er omtalen av Hoff underholdende nok:

{{#ifeq:|inline|««Remarkable instance of longevity

On the 8th of March, 1764, died at Fishkill, Duchess county, New York, mr. Eglebert Hoff, in the one hundred and twenty-eighth year of his age. He was born in Norway, and remembered that he was a lad driving a team, when news was brought to his country, that King Charles I. was beheaded. He served as a soldier under the prince of Orange, afterwards king of England, in the time of king James II. In queen Anne's war, he went a privateering out of New York, being then aged seventy. When he returned, he married, had twelve children, and afterwards lived a widower thirty-three years. He never used spectacles, but read fluently. His memory and senses were entirely strong until death which was occasioned by a fall that mortally hurt his hip.»» {{#if:|– }}|

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Sitat«Remarkable instance of longevity
On the 8th of March, 1764, died at Fishkill, Duchess county, New York, mr. Eglebert Hoff, in the one hundred and twenty-eighth year of his age. He was born in Norway, and remembered that he was a lad driving a team, when news was brought to his country, that King Charles I. was beheaded. He served as a soldier under the prince of Orange, afterwards king of England, in the time of king James II. In queen Anne's war, he went a privateering out of New York, being then aged seventy. When he returned, he married, had twelve children, and afterwards lived a widower thirty-three years. He never used spectacles, but read fluently. His memory and senses were entirely strong until death which was occasioned by a fall that mortally hurt his hip.»
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Referanser

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Litteratur

  • The American Museum, Or Universal Magazine, Vol. VIII, juli–desember 1790, Philadelphia: Carey, Stewart & Co., 1790, s. 45.
  • Vital Records from the New Hampshire Gazette, 1756–1800. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2003.) Unpublished abstracts taken by Priscilla Hammond, "Vital Records Contained In the New Hampshire Gazette 1756–1800," 1937.